The Twinkie—1930 – 2012: RIP

This is Hostess’s last stand.  This is the second time they have been bankrupt, 2004 was the first.  Now you have people talking about auctioning Twinkies for thousands of dollars.  What did them in?  Unions—the nation’s second biggest economic nemesis.

Personally, I am not a Twinkie person.  Nobody at Hostess is at fault; my sweet tooth leads the direction of chocolate.  Occasionally those chocolate cup cakes with the laced white icing or a Devil Dog, but I never acquired a taste for the Twinkie.  I have the utmost respect for nutritionalists and I certainly do not think the government should bail out a company that indirectly promotes childhood obesity, but I lament for the middle class wage earners who will be out of a job.  Too bad the top brass at Hostess did not see the way they could have saved their company, Twinkie The Kid, and all those menial jobs.  In bankruptcy, a company does not have to honor contracts, including union contracts.  They could have laid off all the union employees, and then restructured as a non-union company and hired non-union employees including rehiring the old union employees as long as they were willing to sacrifice their union affiliation.  It would have been risky; they could have received Hell on Earth from the Teamsters and many other unions for decades to come, but then again the greatest risk is not taking one.  Now Hostess and Wonder Bread trucks will no longer don our interstate highways and grocery store loading docks.  This is not helping our eight percent average national unemployment.

During the plight of the factory worker in the early lasses-faire days of the industrial revolution, unions were necessary—I get that.  What happened is union bosses got too powerful.  John Locke told us power inevitably corrupts; no man or woman that ever lived has successfully resisted all of Satan’s temptation and greed is a big one.  This is not an exoneration of corporate greed; but corporate greed would be more manageable with reasonable regulation, not excessive regulation, had it not been coupled with union greed.  It is like riding a high powered locomotive to Hell with two high speed engines, one called corporate and one called union.  I also believe today’s worker would prefer to be reviewed by a boss on an annual basis, with clear cut goals to earn more money later, than be a union slave

So far what we must do is (1) bring back manufacturing (2) become as energy independent as much as possible (3) de-unionize, and (4) provide opportunities for people, especially college graduates at the top of their class, opportunities to use their skills in their own small businesses. —the problem is if they take a job in a union shop, they have no choice and soon acquire a taste for union mentality.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: