Domestic Oil and Alternative Energy

I recently received an email from a co-worker and friend about domestic oil in satire form that brings up a very good point:

A lot of  folks can’t understand how we came   to  have an oil shortage here in our  country.
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Well, there’s a very simple  answer.
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Nobody bothered to check the oil.
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We  just didn’t know we were getting low.
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The reason for that  is purely geographical.
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ALASKA
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California
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Coastal Florida
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Coastal Louisiana
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Coastal Alabama
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Coastal Mississippi
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Coastal Texas
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North Dakota
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Wyoming
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Colorado
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Kansas
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Oklahoma
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Pennsylvania
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And
Texas
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Our dipsticks are located  in DC
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Any Questions?

NO? Didn’t think So.
Understood, some of the above areas are more environmentally sensitive than others.  You could probably eliminate Coastal Florida because we don’t want another [BP] disaster.  And the reason for alternative green energy development is to be more environmental sensitive—understood.  The problem is we need domestic oil for the time being to keep going and something has to power our laboratories while we develop the alternatives.  So we will have to tolerate some drilling; it’s medicine we have to take for now.

Also understand, many alternative energy sources have environmental consequences of their own.  Solar energy is relatively clean and will do well at the microscopic level—we are considering installing solar panels on the roof of our home in Oxford, Connecticut as means of supplemental energy to lower our utility bill and our lights can stay on during a power outage.  But at the macroscopic level, collectors large enough to function as power plants to power an entire [community] would require sacrificing land spanning ten football fields in length.  Recently, the Kleen Energy Corporation opened a natural gas power plant in Middletown, Connecticut, north and east of my locality and had a massive explosion.  The process of fracking to extract oil from shale rock has been known to contaminate drinking water.  Growing corn for ethanol and other energy usage is very clean, but the more corn America (and for that matter, the world) grows for fuel, the less available land there is to grow food and worldwide hunger becomes a issue (I say to that, stop growing tobacco and you’ll have plenty of corn for fuel and plenty of food, someday they will catch on).  We have to wait until we are in Heaven before we see the perfect solution anyway.

You can’t blame us Republicans for wanting to do a reasonable amount of drilling to have oil until we can reach some acceptable nirvana with respect to alternative energy and to bring the cost down so middle-class Americans don’t have to break the bank to fill the tank.  I do not, however, subscribe to the Newt Gingrich $2.50 a gallon plan he was trying to get votes in primaries for the nomination as a presidential candidate.  He did his homework determining where U.S. oil is located, but he also wants to release oil from the strategic reserves affecting the military’s supply.  If we use that up, and God forbid another 9-11-01 equivalent, we’re screwed.  $2.99 a gallon or low threes with reasonable drilling in the most environmental way possible is better than tapping into military reserves to lower prices temporarily.

Another point is the goal is to purchase as little oil from Arabia as possible; but not a reduction to zero.  America buying oil from OPEC and Arab nations is the only thing that prevents a Jihad from organizing and the Arab world torching Israel.  Some form of appeasement is necessary in this sensitive area.  The real issue in Arabia is with China buying up so much Arab oil (part of why we have to pay more in the U.S. today) is that the mid-east will ultimately go the way of Texas as oil wells start drying up.  Availability will become just as much an issue as price.  Just think, domestic oil and a gradual transition to alternatives, China could be forced to buy from us!  Perhaps this is another step in taking back America!

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